ess of thought. The King, whose glance d■ominates the State, measures its lim

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    i■ts, and is aware of purposes which■ ex

    tend beyond it. He

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    re a second illusion is n■ecessary, the religious i

    llusion w■h

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    ose dogmas symbolise a profound unity● and a universal lo

    ve. The King mus

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    t sustain it ●among his subjects. The or●di

    nary man, if he

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    be penetrated with■ this double illusion, c

    an live ●a happy

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    and a worthy life: his wa■y is made clear, he is sa

    ved■. But the l

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    ife of the prince and● his counsellors is a graver

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    gerous thing. They propagate the ill●usions, therefor

    e they judge the

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    m. Life app■ears to them unveiled, and th●ey know ho

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    ng it is. "The ●great man, the exceptional m■a

    n," writes Wagner, "

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    finds hims■elf practically every day in the s■ame conditio

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    he ordinary man desp●airs of life, and has reco

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person

The prince a

nd the● aristocracy which surrounds● him, his nobles,

are forearmed by their val■our against so cowardly a temptation.[Pg ●78] Nevertheless, they experienc■e a bitter need to "turn their back on th●e world." They desire for themselves a r■estful illusion, of which they may be at ●the same time the authors an●d the accessories. Here art intervenes to■ save them, not to exalt the na?ve ent■husiasm of t

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he people, b

ut to■ alleviate the unhappy life of the nobles a■nd to sust

ain their valour. "Art," writes● Richard Wagner, addressing Louis II., "I■ present to my very dear frie■nd as the promised and benignant land. If A■rt cannot lift us in a real and complete mann■er above life,

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at least it lifts■ us in life itself to the ve●ry highest of regions. It gives life the a●ppearance of a game, it withdraws us■ from the common lot, it ravishes